Neue Publikationen

Eine Reihe von neuen Publikationen sind über die letzten Monate entstanden. Details zu den Publikationen finden sich auf der entsprechenden Seite (Link).

Abegg, B., Steiger, R. & Trawöger, L. (2017): Resilience and Perceptions of Problems in Alpine Regions. In: Butler, R.W. (ed.): Tourism and Resilience. Wallingford: CABI Publications: 105–117.

Abegg, B. & Steiger, R. (2017): Die Zukunft des Wintertourismus in Österreich gestalten. Innsbrucker Jahresbericht 2016-2017. Innsbruck: 211-221.

Meinel, U. & Abegg, B. (2017): A multi-level perspective on climate risks and drivers of entrepreneurial robustness – Findings from sectoral comparison in alpine Austria. Global Environmental Change 44: 68-82.

Steiger, R. & Abegg, B. (2017): Klimawandel und Skigebiete im Ostalpenraum. In: Roth, R. & Schwark, J. (eds.): Wirtschaftsfaktor Sporttourismus. Schriften zu Freizeit und Tourismus 19, Berlin: Erich Schmidt Verlag: 137-145.

Steiger, R., & Abegg, B. (2018): Ski areas‘ competitiveness in the light of climate change: comparative analysis in the Eastern Alps. In: Müller, D.K. & Więckowski, M. (eds.): Tourism in Transition – Recovering Decline, Managing Change. Cham: Springer: 187–199.

Abegg et al. (2017). Resilience and Perceptions of Problems in Alpine Regions

Abegg, B., Steiger, R. & Trawöger, L. (2017): Resilience and Perceptions of Problems in Alpine Regions. In: Butler, R.W. (ed.): Tourism and Resilience. Wallingford: CABI Publications: 105–117.

Conclusion:
There is a considerable gap in the perception of the urgency to act and adapt to climatic changes between science and the tourism industry. Summarizing the reasons for and the possibilities to overcome this gap, several research needs can be identified. First of all, science needs to base the impact assessment on indicators and timeframes the industry is willing and able to work with. Potential impacts of extreme winter seasons and the managerial and behavioural options to adapt to extreme situations are worth being investigated. More detailed knowledge on potential behavioural adaptation of tourists is also required, as this component of the tourism system has the highest capacity to adapt and adaptation can be made immediately, for example by temporal, spatial or activity substitution. The integration of supply- and demand-side reactions and options is vital for understanding the sensitivity and adaptive capacity of tourism destinations to a changing climate. More emphasis should be placed on the social aspects of climate change adaptation. Tourism businesses (e.g. ski-area operators) are part of larger tourism systems, and these systems, again, are part of communities/regions. A series of actors is involved, and very little is known how these actors – within the tourism system and beyond – interact. Wyss (2013), for example, argues that adaptation in a mountain tourism context can only be understood (and planned) when both the action potential of the individual actors (e.g. adaptive capacity) and the structural components of the system (e.g. cooperation, networks, power relations, etc.) are taken into account.
Climate is only one driver of change, and it is time to move beyond adapting to climate change and to embed adaptation in responses to multiple stresses. Combining climate change adaptation with hazard research, sustainability science, and community and regional resilience offers interesting perspectives. Disaster risk reduction, for example, has a long tradition in mountain environments; it has developed its own set of tools to assess vulnerability and deal with risks, many of these tools being widely accepted in the respective communities and regions (see Kaján and Saarinen, 2013). The notion of resilience and its application to climate change-related studies in tourism, on the other hand, are still relatively new (Lew, 2014). A specific resilience-based perspective on how local/regional winter tourism systems can deal with external disturbances (including climate change) is only beginning to emerge but offers a promising way to cope with complex change processes (Luthe and Wyss, 2014, 2016) – and the suggestions made in this chapter to bridge the science–industry gap, in particular a system-based approach that looks at different disturbances and different scales, is fully in line with current resilience thinking.

Steiger & Abegg (2017): Klimawandel und Skigebiete im Ostalpenraum

Steiger, R. & Abegg, B. (2017): Klimawandel und Skigebiete im Ostalpenraum. In: Roth, R. & Schwark, J. (eds.): Wirtschaftsfaktor Sporttourismus. Schriften zu Freizeit und Tourismus 19, Berlin: Erich Schmidt Verlag: 137-145.

Zusammenfassung:

Die Signale für die Zukunft des Skitourismus sind zwar regional differenziert, jedoch recht klar: Die Zahl der schneesicheren Skigebiete wird sich im Laufe der nächsten Jahrzehnte deutlich verringern (zuerst am Alpenrand) und zu massiven Steigerungen beim Beschneiungsbedarf und dem damit verbundenen Ressourcenbedarf führen. Der Klimawandel wird somit den Strukturwandel im Skitourismus noch beschleunigen. Skigebiete, die heute robust und gut aufgestellt sind, könnten von dieser Entwicklung möglicherweise sogar profitieren, während Skigebiete, die heute schon mit Problemen zu kämpfen haben, schneller an den Rand der Existenz gedrängt werden. Aus diesen Gründen sind Entscheidungsträger im Tourismus, aber auch in der Politik, gefordert, sich mit den möglichen Folgen des Klimawandels auf den Skitourismus in ihrer Region auseinanderzusetzen. 

 

Meinel & Abegg (2017). A multi-level perspective on climate risks and drivers of entrepreneurial robustness – Findings from sectoral comparison in alpine Austria

Meinel, U., Abegg, B. (2017). A multi-level perspective on climate risks and drivers of entrepreneurial robustness – Findings from sectoral comparison in alpine Austria. Global Environmental Change 44, p. 68-82 (Link)

Highlights:
– We present the results of a firm survey on perceptions of climate risks.
– Climate risks in supply chain networks and drivers of robustness are examined.
– Five strategic principles of entrepreneurial robustness are identified.
– The contingent nature of drivers is conceptualized from a multi-level perspective.

Abstract:
Recent works on organizational adaptation to climate change have repeatedly stressed that – despite concerns about large-scale impacts of climate change on supply chain networks – studies on climate change adaptation in manufacturing industries are still surprisingly scarce. The following study develops a systemic analytical framework based on which climate risks for manufacturing industries are reviewed and drivers (defined as supportive factors) of entrepreneurial robustness are examined. The analysis builds upon a case study in the alpine Austrian state of Tyrol where an intense regional rise of average temperatures occurs, going along with increased risks of natural mountain hazards and exposed settlement structures. In this climate-sensitive setting the authors conducted a survey on risk perceptions among 102 managers from manufacturing firms. Based on a comparison of the sectors metal and engineering, timber products, and construction, the authors argue that drivers of entrepreneurial robustness can be subsumed under five major strategic principles: (a) the deployment of slack resources, (b) vertical supply chain integration, (c) manufacturing flexibility, (d) material efficiency, and (e) technological risk prevention. Departing from the empirical results, the authors argue that across these principles the development of drivers depends on an interplay of structural prerequisites and human decisions on the levels of the focal firm, the supply chain network, and the political, economic, and geographic environment. In this sense, the authors conceptualize different forms of contingencies – thus effects influencing the development of drivers – within an ontology which may support further system-oriented analysis of climate change adaptation in industry.

Vorträge bei der Jahrestagung des Arbeitskreises für Tourismusforschung in der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Geographie

Die Jahrestagung des Arbeitskreises für Tourismusforschung in der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Geographie (DGfG) fand Mitte Juni im Center da Capricorns in Wergenstein/Schweiz statt.

Die Tagung griff das Thema „Nachhaltigkeit und Tourismus: 25 Jahre nach Rio – und jetzt?“ auf. Das Programm der Tagung gibt es hier.

Die Alpine Tourismusgeographie war mit zwei Vorträgen vertreten: Prof. Dr. Bruno Abegg & Mag. Rainer Unger zum Thema Mobilität; Dr. Robert Steiger & Mag. Eva Posch in der Sitzung Klimawandel.

Wergenstein im Naturpark Beverin, Sitz der ZHAW Forschungsgruppe Tourismus und Nachhaltige Entwicklung.